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My most recent work

Over the past year or so I’ve had the good fortune to work with a number of news outlets. Each has been different, and have helped me grow as a reporter. I’ve put links to the work below, along with a brief description of what the piece is about. For additional clips, please don’t hesitate to email me at peregrinefrissell@gmail.com.   I wrote a piece for Greenwich Time, my current employer, about non-native Italian Wall Lizards using the Metro North train line to travel north from the Bronx, where they escaped from captivity decades ago and have been living since. It’s a classic tale of climate change and species adaptation leading to a changing ecosystem for a species that is now being spotted farther north than many populations in Europe. The piece ran in my newspaper and was picked up by other papers throughout Fairfield County, along with SFGate, the Washington Times and the Portland Press Herald in Maine. My reporting on the issue was referenced in the New York Times. Here is the link to my work: http://www.greenwichtime.com/local/article/Scientists-track-reptiles-migration-from-New-9187493.php …

My farewell to the Nepali Times

My time here in Nepal has come to a close, and I know that when I picked up writing for the paper I became much worse about updating my blog. I’m leaving the country early tomorrow morning on a plane bound through Istanbul and then on to New York City. Despite the wonderful time I had here, I am certainly ready to head back to the wonderful place I am fortunate enough to call home. My last assignment for the paper was to write a short blog post about my experiences here. It ought to be published on the Nepali Times website before too long, but I thought it might be a nice thing to throw up here as well: Thank you Nepal Working with the Nepali Times these last couple months has been a privilege and an honor. Like many international travelers, I had made my plans to come to Nepal well in advance of the quake. After the 25th of April I received a lot of discouragement from many folks around me who …

Three day trek in the Annapurna circuit

This week I got to go on a three day trek in the Annapurna circuit. The trip was sponsored by the Trekking Agency Association of Nepal, and brought along a handful of journalists along with around 30 owners of trekking agencies to showcase the state of the trails and infrastructure in the Annapurna range. The area is in excellent condition, with extremely minimal damage from the earthquake on the 25th of April. What most of the nice folks who own guesthouses and trekking agencies and depend on guiding and trekkers for their livelihood need is not aid supplies, but tourists. So, if you think maybe you want to go on vacation soon but haven’t decided where, this would be one hell of an option. One owner of a local restaurant in the lakeside city of Pokhara told me that each tourist that visits Nepal provides work for at least ten Nepalis, from trekking guides to taxi drivers and waiters and guesthouse owners. The trek was gorgeous, and I would advise recommend going to anyone. Unlike backpacking …

Full swing in Kathmandu

When I landed in Kathmandu I was greeted not with a city of tents where all but a few buildings had been reduced to rubble, as one may have expected after reading the international media coverage. Instead over the first several days here I experienced a nation far more genuine and well preserved (culturally if not structurally) than my last temporary home in Bangkok. Kathmandu, my home for the next two months and the city where I’ll be performing the bulk of my internship for the Nepali Times, was not ravaged nearly as badly as many parts of the country. Eighty percent of the buildings in the city were not damaged, and much of the rubble has been cleared away in the six weeks since the first earthquake. Food shops are open, vegetable stands are up, and children run and play in the streets. Here is my first reported piece published by the Nepali Times: http://nepalitimes.com/page/tourists-trickle-back-to-Bhaktapur Not to say that all is well, either. I am slowly piecing together an image of what Kathmandu was like …

My, what a nice temple.

This is a temple that I saw when I visited Khao Sam Roi Yot National Park around a month ago. In order to get there a friend and I took a mini-bus from Bangkok south to the town of Hua Hin, which is about three hours away and on the coast of the Gulf of Thailand. Hua Hin is a very tourist-oriented town, with many bars and resorts and department stores. They also have lots of places to rent motor bikes, and that’s what we did. In Thailand you can rent a motor bike for about 200 baht, or just over six US dollars a day. You don’t even have to have a license. Incidentally, motor bike accidents are very common in Thailand. You also have to put a 60 dollar deposit down, but as long as you don’t scratch or break the bike at all and return it on time then they give it back to you later. Hopefully. We got our deposits back, which was nice. They also give us a free helmet. We …

#TBT to the first time I went grocery shopping alone in Thailand

This is was the result of my first attempt at grocery shopping for myself in the great nation of Thailand. I think it was my second day here. The prospect of going into a new grocery store and seeing all the awesome stuff that I had never even previously contemplated existing was exciting, but then after about 12 minutes I got all stressed out because it was super crowded I just checked out right there. I think I covered the most important bases though. My diet over consists of several core food groups, namely rice, fruit, beer, cucumbers, stir-fry/curry, and tea. It’s a good life really, and rather cheap too. That being said, I do frequently and passionately miss the home cooking of my wonderful parents and sister. Aubrey and I help sometimes too, but they deserve most of the credit. I hope you guys are doing well!

Long Live the King

This is a picture of the King that hangs above the entrance to my classroom on the second floor of the political science building at Thammasat University. There is another one inside, and one of his wife the Queen as well. Images of the King are numerous across the country. As soon as one leaves the parking lot at the large airport outside of town that services most international flights they pass under a large overpass with a huge picture of him that is lit at night, greeting you before anything else can. Every Thai household has numerous pictures of him. They seem to be most common near the entry ways, but in most houses I have been in they have one in almost every room, oftentimes hanging on the wall amongst the family portraits, or sometimes just above the family portraits in a row of his own. Many cab drivers keep images of him somewhere on the dashboard, and restaurants all have them hanging around the seating area. There will be huge structures that …

This is where I eat breakfast most days

There is a woman down the street who cooks me breakfast about every morning now. At the beginning of my time here I would go to her maybe three times a week, but now my day simply doesn’t seem right if it doesn’t begin sitting in her yard on her little plastic stools at a card table, greeted by her smile. I immediately resolved to make this woman my friend. The first time I walked into her stand, my third day in Thailand, she had a large banner with four pictures of food in a vertical arrangement hanging near her oven. I pointed at the image on top, and she laughed, smiled, and cooked it for me. The next time I went to her, two days later, I pointed to the next one down, and she did the exact same thing. It was so delicious that despite my best intentions of trying everything on the menu, I’ve had that every single time I have been there since. It’s a plate of white rice, with a …

#TBT to that day that I visited the Bridge over the River Kwai

In the spirit of Throwback Thursday and also of my procrastination, here is a picture of me at the storied Bridge over the River Kwai. It may sound familiar because there is a famous WWII film about it. The film was actually filmed in Sri Lanka, but maybe that’s just because the one in Thailand is actually rather beautiful, which is aesthetically counter to it’s violent past. During WWII, the Japanese who controlled the area used the railway to bring in prisoners of many different ethnic groups and nationalities all to work together on construction of this bridge. There were British prisoners working alongside Burmese and other laborers from all over Asia. The construction is notorious because while it took only a year, the difficult terrain and disease-laden swampy landscape led it to claim thousands of worker lives. I found that, like many things in Thailand, it is today surrounded by food carts, restaurants, and several small resorts and hotels. The bridge itself has rail tracks that are maintained, but when I was there the bridge was full of …

Autthaya, ho!

Last weekend brought me on several cool adventures, and I thought I would share the most photogenic here. On Sunday I took a trip up to the old capitol, Ayutthaya. The city lies just north of Bangkok, about two hours by the slow third class train. The trip costs 20 baht (about $0.70) each way, and is oftentimes filled to standing capacity with Thai people commuting to the city for work and tourists headed to and from the historic destination. Here is a picture of the inside of the train the day that I went: Autthaya has grown and remains relevant and is today a moderately-sized city with many modern buildings and permanent residents. The remnants of the old city, which you can see in my pictures below, are scattered throughout the new city. To give you a good idea of the distance, the best way to get around would definitely have been by bicycle. Due to my exceptional planning discipline, I did a lot of walking that day. The city was founded circa 1350, …